Crock pot bone broth recipe

Savory Bone Broth Recipe

Stock is absolutely fundamental to healing the gut lining, the lining of the small intestine-specifically, the duodenum. Gelatinous stock and meat stock are liquid nutrition for lactating mothers, menopausal women and children, whose bones are growing. It is also a perfect first food for infants.

When making a bone broth, the main constituent of the final product we are looking for is gelatin. A nutrient-dense stock contains gelatin; it gels when it is cooled. Gelatin has been known to help heal many digestive and other disorders, including anemia, diabetes, colitis, rheumatoid arthritis and even cancer.

Stock can play a large role in healing disorders that stem from a damaged gut lining, namely food allergies, ADD, AD/HD, Autism Spectrum Disorders, dyslexia, dyspraxia, schizophrenia, and depression. Because stock is high in hydrophilic colloids which attract digestive juices, stock aids in digestion.

Bone broth is high in calcium and other minerals that are easily absorbed because they are in an electrolytic state. Stock also acts as a “protein-sparer”, which allows you to efficiently utilize the protein you eat and can reduce the amount of protein you need.

How can you tell if your bone broth contains gelatin? After refrigerating overnight, a stock that contains a high amount of gelatin, will gel just like if you were making Jello!

If your stock fails to gel when cooled, it is possible that anyone or combination of the following was true:

  • Not enough bones with cartilage (joints, that is, or in the case of poultry, feet)
  • Too much water to bones
  • Too much meat to bones (happens with chicken a lot)
  • Cooked at too high heat
  • Added too much water while cooking

Easy Hands-Off Savory Bone Broth

Ingredients

4 pounds raw chicken bones (such as back, feet, or necks)
2 large carrots, cut into 2-inch pieces
2 small yellow onions, peeled and quartered
1 garlic head, halved crosswise
6 cups water
2 celery stalks, cut into 2-inch pieces
14-oz. can whole tomatoes
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
10 thyme sprigs 
2 (2-inch) lemon peel pieces 
1 fresh bay leaf 
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

Pressure Cooker Instructions

Add water, celery, tomatoes, peppercorns, thyme sprigs, lemon peel pieces, and bay leaf to 6 qt pressure cooker. Close and lock lid of cooker; turn pressure release valve to sealing position. Program cooker to cook on Manual on High Pressure for 1 hour. Turn pressure valve to the venting position to quickly release pressure (steam) from cooker until float valve drops. Carefully remove lid. Pour broth through a fine wire-mesh strainer into a bowl; discard solids. For a more clear broth, strain a second time through cheesecloth. Stir in salt, add additional to taste if needed. Place in refrigerator overnight. The fat will rise to the surface and may be removed (reserved for cooking or discarded). Enjoy 1 cup per day!

Slow Cooker Instructions

Add water, celery, tomatoes, peppercorns, thyme sprigs, lemon peel pieces, and bay leaf to6 quart slow cooker. Cover and cook on low for 20-24 hours. Let broth cool enough to handle. Pour broth through a fine wire-mesh strainer into a bowl; discard solids. For a more clear broth, strain a second time through cheesecloth. Stir in salt, add additional to taste if needed. Place in refrigerator overnight. The fat will rise to the surface and may be removed (reserved for cooking or discarded). Enjoy 1 cup per day!